Past Events

Monday, April 9, 2018

Jung and Freud: Similarities and Key Differences in Theory and Practice by Felicity Kelcourse, Ph.D., LMHC
From 1906 until 1913 Freud and Jung collaborated on the early development of psychoanalytic theory. From there, Jung went his own way. Some of Jung's distinctive theoretical contributions have since been adopted by intersubjective and relational analysts. Jung’s approach to dreams and the pre-oedipal image level of the psyche will be described. Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe key theoretical differences between psychoanalysis and analytical psychology as currently practiced; 2. Participants will be able to describe specific instances in which Freud and Jung influenced each other's work in the early days of psychoanalysis; and 3. Participants will be able to give examples of the ways that Jung's approach to dreams and the pre-oedipal psyche differ from Freud's.
07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208
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Saturday, March 17, 2018

Spring Workshop Day 2 by Jessican Benjamin, Ph.D.
Jessica Benjamin, Ph.D., has been a practicing psychoanalyst in New York City for over 35 years and is a Clinical Professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Psychology program in Psychotherapy. She is known as a contributor to the development of relational psychoanalysis and its interrelation with feminism as well as the theory of intersubjectivity. She is the author of four books: The Bonds of Love (1988); Like Subjects, Love Objects (1995); Shadow of the Other (1998); and Beyond Doer and Done To-Recognition Theory, Intersubjectivity and the Third (2017). Dr. Benjamin is known for offering a relational psychoanalytic perspective in which recognition of the other plays a crucial role in the development of the self. In this lecture, she presents this view along with a discussion of the psychoanalytic notion of reparation. She will discuss how relational repair can help to free people from the troubling binary of “doer” and “done to” by way of a psychology based on the non-violent position of respect for all suffering. Dr. Benjamin will discuss the theory of enactment and its psychotherapeutic use. Enactment, she will propose, has a bi-directional nature that results in a tension between repetition and repair. Drawing on the work of Gregory Bateson, Dr. Benjamin will offer a way to think about holding this tension in an intersubjective or “third” space. Case examples of enactment and acknowledgment will be discussed. There will also be time for discussion about Dr. Benjamin’s conception of intersubjective space and its practical import.
09:00 am - 03:00 pm
Christian Theological Seminary
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Friday, March 16, 2018

Spring Workshop Day 1 by Jessican Benjamin, Ph.D.
Jessica Benjamin, Ph.D., has been a practicing psychoanalyst in New York City for over 35 years and is a Clinical Professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Psychology program in Psychotherapy. She is known as a contributor to the development of relational psychoanalysis and its interrelation with feminism as well as the theory of intersubjectivity. She is the author of four books: The Bonds of Love (1988); Like Subjects, Love Objects (1995); Shadow of the Other (1998); and Beyond Doer and Done To-Recognition Theory, Intersubjectivity and the Third (2017). Dr. Benjamin is known for offering a relational psychoanalytic perspective in which recognition of the other plays a crucial role in the development of the self. In this lecture, she presents this view along with a discussion of the psychoanalytic notion of reparation. She will discuss how relational repair can help to free people from the troubling binary of “doer” and “done to” by way of a psychology based on the non-violent position of respect for all suffering. Dr. Benjamin will discuss the theory of enactment and its psychotherapeutic use. Enactment, she will propose, has a bi-directional nature that results in a tension between repetition and repair. Drawing on the work of Gregory Bateson, Dr. Benjamin will offer a way to think about holding this tension in an intersubjective or “third” space. Case examples of enactment and acknowledgment will be discussed. There will also be time for discussion about Dr. Benjamin’s conception of intersubjective space and its practical import.
07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
Christian Theological Seminary
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Monday, February 12, 2018

Understanding and Working with Rigidity by Anne Taylor, LCSW
We will be thinking about about 3 types of rigidity in individuals: 1. Obsessive compulsive character style including aspects of functioning and modes of activity; 2. Defensive aspects of entitlement and how they are expressed; and 3. Four modes of functioning in self mutilation. Case examples will be included and invited from participants. Learning objectives: 1. Participants will be able to name 3 aspects of an obsessive personality style; 2. Participants will be able to summarize how entitlement serves defensive functions; 3. Participants will understand how self-mutilation/masochism is an expression of rigid character.
07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208
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Monday, January 8, 2018

Integrating Psychodynamic Principles into the Conceptualization and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunction by Maria Hanzlik, Psy.D., HSPP, AASECT Certified Sex Therapist
Since the time of Masters and Johnson in the 1970s, who conducted extensive sex research and subsequent treatment, sex therapy conceptualization and intervention has often been approached from a cognitive-behavioral lens. Similarly, sexual concerns conceptualized from a psychoanalytic framework may inadvertently and unnecessarily assign more pathology to a sexual condition than is warranted. This talk will explore the integration of psychodynamic principles into an overall conceptualization and treatment of sexual concerns using didactic lecture, case examples, and group discussion. Learning objectives: 1. Name 5 important areas to explore in the assessment of sexual dysfunction; 2. Name two psychoeducational models of healthy sexual functioning; 3. Identify three psychodynamically-oriented interventions to treat sexual dysfunction; and 4. Apply assessment and therapy strategies to case examples using group discussion.
07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208
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Monday, November 13, 2017

Yearning for the Vastness of the Sea: The Relational Matrix and the Analytic Process by Elgan Baker, Ph.D., HSPP

07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208
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Monday, October 9, 2017

The Psychodynamics of EMDR: A Neurobiologic Understanding of Mind and Memory by Andrea Barbour, M.A., LMFT
This presentation explores the ways in which EMDR can be understood psychodynamically and integrated into analytic theory. This integration allows clinicians to make use of EMDR’s neurobiologic understanding of how mind and memory work. Learning Objectives: 1. Name three areas of the brain responsible for processing/encoding memory; 2. Discuss two ways in which EMDR can be integrated with psychodynamic theory; and 3. Apply one neurobiologic concept to aid you in understanding how your patient processes trauma.
07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208
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Monday, September 11, 2017

From Symptom to Meaning in the Out-Patient Treatment of Psychosis: An Ethic of Speech in Psychoanalysis with the Psychotic Subject by David Downing, Psy.D., ABPP
Psychoanalysis with psychotic patients is well-suited to elucidate and address the unique vicissitudes of the psychotic process, afforded by the free associations of the patient, as well as the psychoanalyst’s distinctive receptivity and potential for various acts of freedom, uniquely afforded by the not-to-be repeated moment-to-moment unfolding of unconscious processes worded within the bi-personal field of the psychotherapeutic pair.  Each participant therefore avoids the traps of other contemporary treatments of being conjoined in a conspiratorial process of suppression and de-linking that collapses enquiry into rote prescriptions and proscriptions for correct thought and bio-behavioural management and control.  Such pressures inevitably lead to further enactments:  to provide any number of palliatives, such as medication, active suggestion, correctives, educative exhortations, et cetera, as demanded by manualised, so-called evidence-based approaches.  Such instrumentalities leave no space for the importance of ‘mind’, or the dynamic unconscious. They negate the wording of self-experience in the patient’s own idiom to the psychoanalyst who embodies an ethic of desire for self-discovery and knowledge. The author of this chapter, like other  practitioners in this text, is confronting head-on the specious arguments in favour of paradigms which have privileged the “damaged brain” (complete with “irrational thoughts” that must be debunked and removed) above all other explanatory paradigms and with this, a “physico-chemical-genetic machine” over an experiencing subject – one who submits him- or herself passively for cognitive and behavioural adjustment – better adaptation and fit to society’s norms.  Through clinical vignettes, the author articulates his efforts to approach the construction of meaning within the neo-reality that resides in the wake of psychotic collapse, and his efforts to maintain an ethic for the elucidation of a savoir of the patient.  The establishment of a space wherein the Question is privileged, and may be asked, reaching like an arc over the hole left by the subject’s act of foreclosure, is a central element of this psychoanalytical journey, opening the possibility of finding meaning as material is brought into the field of speech. Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to articulate basic elements of Freudian-Lacanian theories in relation to the psychoanalytical treatment of psychosis; 2. Participants treating psychotic subjects will be able to incorporate aspects of psychoanalytical praxis into their own clinical work; and 3. Participants will be able to delineate aspects of the out-patient milieu they may need to construct in order to sustain out-patient clinical work with psychotic individuals.


07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
CTS Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor, 1050 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46208

Monday, May 8, 2017

The Practice of Female Circumcision: Cultural Implications for Psychoanalytic Thought by Nour Abdelghani, M.A.

Cultural influences behind the practice of female circumcision in various regions of the world were discussed by the presenter. The presenter provided a historical context that gave rise to the practice and explore how and why the practice continues to the present day. Using psychoanalytic theory, the speaker engaged the audience in a discussion of the dynamics that contribute to propagating the practice both across and within genders. Finally, the presenter discussed some of the psychological effects on women who have been circumcised including post-traumatic stress, anxiety, depression, attachment and sexual disorders and implications for the treatment of these disorders. Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will gain an understanding of the history and cultural implications that give rise to the practice of female circumcision in the communities that continue to promote it; 2. Participants will gain an understanding of the psychological impact of female circumcision including symptoms of post-traumatic stress, attachment disorders, depression, anxiety and sexual disorders; and 3. Participants will engage in a discussion of the intersection between psychoanalytic theory on female circumcision and the cross-cultural lens. 


07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
Christian Theological Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor

Monday, April 10, 2017

Paradox, Parallel, Love & Rejection by Sally Kennedy, M.A., LMHC, LMFT

This presentation covered a psychoanalytic conceptualization of couple's psychotherapy. Learning Objectives: 1. Explain how paradox can be used to help couples understand their cycle; 2. Explain how understanding the concept of a parallel  between couples might enhance the couple's ability to identify with their partner; 3. Explain how love and rejection interplay in forming negative and sometimes durable bonds.


07:00 pm - 09:00 pm
Christian Theological Counseling Center, 3rd Floor Parlor